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RESEARCH ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 19-23

Effects of exergames on motor coordination and balance in convalescent drug addicts: A feasibility study


1 Department of Sports, University of State of Para, Campus de Altamira, Altamira, PA, Brazil
2 Doctoral and Master Program in Rehabilitation Sciences, Nove de Julho University, São Paulo, Brazil
3 Department of Physiotherapy, Neuropediatrics Section, Federal University of São Carlos, São Carlos, Brazil
4 Department of Sports, University of State of Para, Campus de Altamira, Altamira, PA; Doctoral and Master Program in Rehabilitation Sciences, Nove de Julho University, São Paulo, Brazil

Correspondence Address:
Ana Francisca Rozin Kleiner
Department of Physiotherapy, Neuropediatrics Section, Federal University of São Carlos, São Carlos
Brazil
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2542-3975.254108

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Background and objectives: Drugs are public health problem in terms of mental and physical impairments. As respect to the physical commitments, addicted people present severe motor coordination and balance disturbances. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of exergames on the rehabilitation of motor coordination and balance in recovering drug addicts. Participants and methods: This is a prospective non-randomized, self-controlled study. Nine male addicts aged 25.78 ± 6.76 years were recruited from the Rescuing Lives Center for Recovery from Alcohol and Drugs, Altamira, Brazil. The intervention consisted of sixteen 45-minute sessions involving the use of virtual reality games (Xbox 360 Kinect console). Evaluations were performed before and after the intervention. The static and dynamic balance was accessed by the Berg Balance Scale, Timed Up and Go test and 6-minute walk test. The motor coordination was assessed by the Senior Motor Scale. Gait was also analyzed using an inertial sensor (G-Walk). This study was conducted at the Rescuing Lives Center for Recovery from Alcohol and Drugs, Altamira, Brazil and received approval from the Human Research Ethics Committee of the Universidade do Estado do Pará - XII Campus (certificate number: 2.129.360) on April 7, 2017. Written informed consent was obtained from each participant. Results: Significant improvements were found in the Berg Balance Scale, Senior Motor Scale and Timed Up and Go test (sitting and standing) after intervention (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01), whereas no significant change occurred on the six-minute walk test (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Virtual reality is a promising technology for improving motor coordination and balance in recovering drug addicts.


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