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RESEARCH ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 36-39

Metastatic adenocarcinoma of the lung presenting as deep vein thrombosis: an evidence of anchoring bias


1 Department of Internal Medicine, Wayne State University; Detroit Medical Center, Detroit, MI, USA
2 Volunteer at Department of Internal Medicine, Wayne State University; Detroit Medical Center, Detroit, MI, USA

Correspondence Address:
Walid Ibrahim
Department of Internal Medicine, Wayne State University; Detroit Medical Center, Detroit, MI
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2542-3975.209685

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Background: Non-small cell lung cancer is the most common type of lung cancer and it is often diagnosed at the advanced stages of this disease. Although skeletal metastasis is a common manifestation of lung cancer, distal appendicular skeletal metastasis, especially distal to the knee and elbow joints, is relatively rare. Case representation: We described a 51-year-old female patient who had been admitted with a classical presentation and diagnosis of lower-extremity deep vein thrombosis that cannot be cured using conventional treatment. Further workup revealed a mass arising from the head of the fibula compressing the adjacent vasculature that was found to be metastatic pulmonary adenocarcinoma. Conclusion: Identifying such uncommon presentations may be delayed or missed due to cognitive errors including anchoring bias. Knowledge and insight of such errors may possibly reduce their incidence and their consequent preventable patient injury.


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